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20121201
20121201
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CSPAN2 3
CSPAN 2
KQED (PBS) 1
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Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 8:00am EST
on the founding fathers. others had written on washington, jefferson, madison, and i'd written on patrick henry, james monroe, james hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's cal woods prize-winning book profiles in courage and their in chapter 1 was john quincy adams. i thought his name begins with a xu chapter 1. that's not the reason he was in chapter 1. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of courage, and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american history. he was not just the sixth president of the united states. he was a congressman as well for 16 years and a center for four years. most americans don't realize he was a congressman. many don't even know he was president. >> by your going to change that. >> yes. he was this enormously courageous congressman. the first congressman to stand up and call for emancipation before lincoln even knew how to spell the word. >> we will get back to emancipation and the abolition movement. someone said to me the other day i have read to biographies of joh
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 10:00am EST
talks about the role of la in china. -- rule of law in china. >> washington worked his way up. at the urging of one of his brothers he immigrated out west where the lead mine industry was in may paid a. he arrived in a ship, by stagecoach. he arrived on steamboat in this muddy town. he established a lot have been in slowly worked his way up. he became a very successful lawyer and then became involved politically. he ran for congress, search for eight terms. in any profession did abraham lincoln -- served for eight terms. as they arised, they were a close colleague during the civil war. after grant was elected president, initially appointed washburn secretary of state. at that time he became very ill. his family actually feared for his life. after about 10 days he submitted his resignation to president grant. grant accepted his resignation. over the next several months he regained his health which was always very fragile. he then offered him the position as minister of france. >> michael hill on the minister to france during the 1870 franco-prussian war. they provide political
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2012 10:30pm EST
cuts. tomorrow on ", washington "" robert -- "washington journal," robert van order on the mortgage loan forgiveness. adult'eman on being an with autism. plus, your emails, phone calls, and tweets. >> c-span, created by cable companies and venture 1979, brought to you as a public service by >> president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end the bush era tax cuts. he spoke at a manufacturing facility in hatfield, pennsylvania, for about 25 minutes. >> thank you! [cheers and applause] >> well, good morning, everybody. everybody, please have a seat, have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello, hatfield! it is good to be back in pennsylvania and it is good to be right here at connects. i want to thank michael airington and the inventor of connects, joel glickman, for hosting me today. where'd they go? stand up so everybody can see you guys. there you go! i just noticed, we got a couple of outstanding members of congress here. chaka pata, and allison schwartz. i just finished getting a tour of the connects workshop. i have to say,
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2012 8:00pm EST
, and there are two types of people in washington. those who really enjoy detailed discussion about senate procedure, and those who don't. welcome. i can see which category you fit into. we have a great panel today to discuss something that's become more and more important moving forward, especially in the current nature of congress where the lines seem to be more and more stark and obvious than as any time as i've been in washington. we have four experts discussing the developments in --cepsbly the filibuster, but the discussion will touch on other areas of senate procedure and precedent, and you'll see a distinction between the two, senate rules and senate precedence on the other. you'll hear from four individuals who have a depth of experience in these matters that, i think, is unrivaled in the city. i'll introduce them briefly so they can turn it over to the discussion. i'll lead off with no particular order, james walden speaking first, working in the house of representatives and the senate, serving as the senate hearing committee. he's an adjunct professor in the department of politics in the
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 12:30pm EST
, twitter.com/booktv. >>> and now joining us on booktv is an old washington hand and that is ambassador stewart. he's an author, the future of jews is the name of the book. ambassador, why are you writing a book about the future of the jews? >> we have survived 3,000 years of calamityies and we survived and leave thrived and contributed to societies even those that didn't want us. now we have a whole new set of 21st century challenges, and the question is having survived those terrible times, can we now survive prosperity, success, and integration? and i look at this from two perspective, the global forces that affect america, american jews, and israel, everything from the shift of power to united states and the west to china and the east hours of globalization in the digital era. how to deal with the 1.6 muslims in the world, the threat of iranian nuclear power, and i also look at internal threats, low birthrates, assimilation, and again, whether we can, in effect, succeed at the time when we are more successful than ever in being integrated to our society. it's a new know mom that. --
PBS
Dec 1, 2012 12:00am PST
who had infur yatesed and embarrassed him when he was on a visit to washington on this action of taking this island, in canada. and winston was really furious. and apparently launch mood this great tirade. and monet was meant to sort of help with the translation of that, ease the passage of all this. and at the end of this tirade apparently de gaulle who was in full uniform simply rose and put on his hat and saluted, and left the room. and churchill who had been absolutely infuriate add cording to monet slided back into his chair an simply said magnificent. >> rose: wait, magnificent in applause. >> applause. >> de gaulles theatre. >> the sense of theatre, in response to churchill's tirade was for him to walk out. >> rose: he so was appreciative of defall. >> there are two people, you know, who are famously opposed not get on and they had flaming rowe but there was a real sense of mutual respect between them because these were two men who hundreds of men stuck up for thane own. >> insomitiable spirit despice-- despite of the odds. >> indomitiable but patriotic. they respected
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6